The Beethoven Reference Site Forums  

Go Back   The Beethoven Reference Site Forums > General > Beethoven and Classical Music Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 04-30-2017, 01:23 PM   #1
Peter
Administrator
 
Peter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 9,557
Lightbulb What are you listening to now?

Shostakovich Festive overture

__________________
'Man know thyself'
Peter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2017, 05:29 PM   #2
Peter
Administrator
 
Peter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 9,557
Stunning performance by György Cziffra of Schumann's fiendishly difficult Toccata

__________________
'Man know thyself'
Peter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2017, 06:10 AM   #3
hal9000
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 263
hal9000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2017, 03:00 PM   #4
Chris
Administrator
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 3,303
Good one, hal9000!

I love the Grosse Fuge, and I wish I had someone with whom to play the piano four hands version.
Chris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2017, 06:00 AM   #5
Peter
Administrator
 
Peter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 9,557
Schubert Quartettsatz played by the Amadeus quartet.

__________________
'Man know thyself'
Peter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2017, 02:04 PM   #6
Peter
Administrator
 
Peter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 9,557
Brahms's beautiful 'Schicksalslied' in a great performance by Phillip Herreweghe

__________________
'Man know thyself'
Peter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2017, 02:55 PM   #7
Michael
Senior Member
 
Michael's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Killarney, Ireland
Posts: 3,559
Schumann: Fourth Symphony.
Michael is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2017, 08:00 PM   #8
Zevy
Senior Member
 
Zevy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Lakewood, NJ USA
Posts: 230
String Quartet in A Minor, Op. 132

Budapest String Quartet — Quartet No. 15 in A Minor, Op. 132 — Live Recording
I'm trying to get into the "Heiliger Dankgesang"
__________________
Zevy
Zevy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2017, 02:21 AM   #9
Michael
Senior Member
 
Michael's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Killarney, Ireland
Posts: 3,559
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zevy View Post
Budapest String Quartet — Quartet No. 15 in A Minor, Op. 132 — Live Recording
I'm trying to get into the "Heiliger Dankgesang"
I found this video very interesting and enlightening:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4c-R544gF8s
Michael is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2017, 01:24 PM   #10
hal9000
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 263
I watched that recently Michael, which is odd since the video was posted in 2008 and I'm surprised I hadn't seen it sooner. I agree with the top comment in that very few times in these piece analysis lectures do you hear anew something you've listened to hundreds of times.
hal9000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2017, 05:02 PM   #11
Zevy
Senior Member
 
Zevy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Lakewood, NJ USA
Posts: 230
That's where I was coming from, Michael & Hal. At least I understand better the form and the theory of the Lydian mode.
These late quartets emphasize the inner battle I have. 95% of me says that Beethoven wrote such great music. Then there's this 5% saying, wait - this is mad stuff!
__________________
Zevy
Zevy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2017, 01:32 PM   #12
Sorrano
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Salt Lake City, UT, USA
Posts: 4,361
Mahler: Symphony No. 6
Sorrano is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2017, 03:51 PM   #13
Michael
Senior Member
 
Michael's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Killarney, Ireland
Posts: 3,559
Schubert's Ninth. (This guy could have passed them all out if he lived even twenty years longer.)
Michael is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2017, 02:58 PM   #14
hal9000
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 263
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael View Post
Schubert's Ninth. (This guy could have passed them all out if he lived even twenty years longer.)
I remember watching an interview with Horowitz on youtube and he said the same thing. He didn't even reach the age in which Beethoven composed the turning point in his musical development in the Eroica. It's a depressing thought what the world has lost with Schubert and Mozart passing so early. Hell, I wish Beethoven had lived 10 more years and given us a couple more symphonies - with his late string quartets as inspiration for a new path, any new symphony would have surely been pretty radical at the time, or maybe he would have scaled back completely but with more life experience and spiritual insight. Op 135 has airings of acceptance and affirmation of life's transience (the last movement especially), and the last piece he ever wrote was one of his most upbeat pieces of music, the coda of which is so perky and full of step that maybe a happier Beethoven would have emerged. But who knows? All three gave us so much great music that takes a lifetime to explore that I can't lament the loss too much.

Last edited by hal9000; 05-25-2017 at 03:13 PM.
hal9000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2017, 06:51 AM   #15
Humoresque
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 122
I totally agree that Schubert would have surpassed all the composers (except, possibly Bach) if he had lived. I become more convinced of it with each passing day. Disagree about Mozart as I feel he had reached is peak by the time he died.

This little masterpiece contains many of the elements which the comparatively young genius Schubert showed us time and time again; his musico-dramatic ability, the use of ostinato to depict movement and drama, and the powerful word painting which was, IMO, second to none:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JuG7Y6wiPL8

And, of course, it helps that his work was sung by the greatest tenor who ever performed Schubert lieder.
Humoresque is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2017, 04:52 PM   #16
Chris
Administrator
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 3,303
Quote:
Originally Posted by Humoresque View Post
This little masterpiece contains many of the elements which the comparatively young genius Schubert showed us time and time again; his musico-dramatic ability, the use of ostinato to depict movement and drama, and the powerful word painting which was, IMO, second to none:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JuG7Y6wiPL8

And, of course, it helps that his work was sung by the greatest tenor who ever performed Schubert lieder.
I knew what this was going to be before I even clicked the link

And I agree on your appraisal of this fine singer!
Chris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2017, 09:11 AM   #17
Peter
Administrator
 
Peter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 9,557
Lightbulb

Quote:
Originally Posted by hal9000 View Post
I remember watching an interview with Horowitz on youtube and he said the same thing. He didn't even reach the age in which Beethoven composed the turning point in his musical development in the Eroica. It's a depressing thought what the world has lost with Schubert and Mozart passing so early. Hell, I wish Beethoven had lived 10 more years and given us a couple more symphonies - with his late string quartets as inspiration for a new path, any new symphony would have surely been pretty radical at the time, or maybe he would have scaled back completely but with more life experience and spiritual insight. Op 135 has airings of acceptance and affirmation of life's transience (the last movement especially), and the last piece he ever wrote was one of his most upbeat pieces of music, the coda of which is so perky and full of step that maybe a happier Beethoven would have emerged. But who knows? All three gave us so much great music that takes a lifetime to explore that I can't lament the loss too much.

I don't see it as depressing at all. I turn it round the other way and imagine if they'd never been born in the first place or if they'd died in childhood which was all too common. We're so lucky to have what we have and all speculation as to what might have been is fruitless. You're right that there is nothing to lament!
__________________
'Man know thyself'
Peter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2017, 07:08 PM   #18
Zevy
Senior Member
 
Zevy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Lakewood, NJ USA
Posts: 230
Amadeus String Quartet — Quartet No. 15 in A Minor, Op. 132
__________________
Zevy
Zevy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2017, 07:19 PM   #19
Chris
Administrator
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 3,303
I've been listening to this a lot lately:

Beethoven
Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major, Op. 58
Zimerman/Bernstein/Vienna Philharmonic



It's one of those works I really started to love later, so it's still quite exciting to revisit.
Chris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2017, 08:57 PM   #20
Michael
Senior Member
 
Michael's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Killarney, Ireland
Posts: 3,559
Sergeant Pepper Remix.
(What else?)
Michael is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2017, 09:39 AM   #21
Peter
Administrator
 
Peter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 9,557
The hauntingly beautiful Schumann 'Ghost Variations' - especially moving as this was Schumann's last work before he was admitted to the asylum in Bonn-Endenich. On 17 or 18 February 1854, Schumann wrote down a theme he said was dictated to him by voices like those of angels. Several days later, he wrote a set of variations on this theme. While he was still working on the composition, on 27 February he suddenly threw himself into the freezing Rhine river, from which he was rescued and returned home. After surviving the suicide attempt, he continued to work on it. The next day, he completed the work and sent the manuscript to his wife, Clara, who had left him the night before, on the advice of a doctor. Due to the harrowing events of this period Clara Schumann (to whom the work is dedicated) jealously guarded the manuscripts of this piece, her husband’s last composition for piano, as if they were sacred relics, and forbade any attempt to publish them. Though Brahms (who himself wrote a set of variations on this theme Op.23) had the theme published in 1893 (without the variations) it was not until 1939 that the first edition finally appeared.

__________________
'Man know thyself'
Peter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2017, 05:53 AM   #22
gprengel
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Muhltal, Germany
Posts: 382
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter View Post
The hauntingly beautiful Schumann 'Ghost Variations' - especially moving as this was Schumann's last work .... Schumann wrote down a theme he said was dictated to him by voices like angels
Peter, don't you think that this wonderful theme which he used also in the 2nd movement of his great violin concerto is actually a Beethoven melody from op. 119 and
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=RK9gnv7oXEA ?
gprengel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2017, 06:28 AM   #23
Peter
Administrator
 
Peter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 9,557
Lightbulb

Quote:
Originally Posted by gprengel View Post
Peter, don't you think that this wonderful theme which he used also in the 2nd movement of his great violin concerto is actually a Beethoven melody from op. 119 and
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=RK9gnv7oXEA ?
There are definitely similarities with these which I don't think Schumann was conscious of (given his mental state at the time) - he used to say he often didn't realise the many canon like imitative passages in his own music until they were pointed out to him!
__________________
'Man know thyself'
Peter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2017, 07:00 AM   #24
gprengel
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Muhltal, Germany
Posts: 382
Yes, this also very obvious when he used the great theme of the Finale of his 2nd symphony taken from Beethovens op. 98 final song "Nimm sie hin denn diese Lieder "!!!!!!
gprengel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2017, 07:37 AM   #25
Peter
Administrator
 
Peter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 9,557
Lightbulb

Quote:
Originally Posted by gprengel View Post
Yes, this also very obvious when he used the great theme of the Finale of his 2nd symphony taken from Beethovens op. 98 final song "Nimm sie hin denn diese Lieder "!!!!!!
Yes well there are examples where he consciously did this as homage to Beethoven such as the Fantasy op.17 quoting the last song of Beethoven's 'An die ferne Geliebte'.
__________________
'Man know thyself'
Peter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2017, 02:33 PM   #26
Peter
Administrator
 
Peter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 9,557
Respighi "Adagio con variazioni"
__________________
'Man know thyself'
Peter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2017, 04:22 PM   #27
Chris
Administrator
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 3,303
Beethoven - Choral Fantasy



I don't come back to this one often enough!
Chris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2017, 11:50 PM   #28
Harvey
Senior Member
 
Harvey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Metro Detroit Area
Posts: 574
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris View Post
Beethoven - Choral Fantasy



I don't come back to this one often enough!
Its a wonderful work! My favorite recording of it is the one conducted by Haitink.
__________________
Quote:
There are no long Wagner operas. Only short attention spans.
Harvey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2017, 03:23 PM   #29
Peter
Administrator
 
Peter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 9,557
Schumann Humoreske Op.20

__________________
'Man know thyself'
Peter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2017, 03:42 PM   #30
Zevy
Senior Member
 
Zevy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Lakewood, NJ USA
Posts: 230
Mozart Piano Concertos 21 & 23

I was listening to a new recording by Simone Dinnerstein. I also listened to Rudolph Serkin/ Abbado of the same concerti, as well as Geza Anda's performance of those along with # 20.
__________________
Zevy
Zevy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2017, 05:53 AM   #31
Megan
Senior Member
 
Megan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Land of Hope and Glory
Posts: 1,758
Felix Mendelssohn -


A Midsummer Night's Dream, Op 21: Overture
Orchestra: London Symphony Orchestra. Conductor: Sir John Eliot Gardiner.
__________________
🎹
Megan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2017, 04:43 PM   #32
Zevy
Senior Member
 
Zevy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Lakewood, NJ USA
Posts: 230
Mozart Piano Concertos
Geza Anda
__________________
Zevy
Zevy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-24-2017, 02:30 PM   #33
Quijote
Senior Member
 
Quijote's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 3,476
Scelsi : "Aion". Very powerful, very sinister...
https://youtu.be/AsTX7Vm7zoM
Quijote is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-24-2017, 08:10 PM   #34
Michael
Senior Member
 
Michael's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Killarney, Ireland
Posts: 3,559
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quijote View Post
Scelsi : "Aion". Very powerful, very sinister...
https://youtu.be/AsTX7Vm7zoM
Mmmm. Cheered me up no end.
Michael is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2017, 08:48 AM   #35
Megan
Senior Member
 
Megan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Land of Hope and Glory
Posts: 1,758
Extreme microtonality?

Actually in a weird way, I like it.
__________________
🎹

Last edited by Megan; 06-25-2017 at 08:59 AM.
Megan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2017, 01:40 PM   #36
Sorrano
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Salt Lake City, UT, USA
Posts: 4,361
Thanks, Don Q! That was well worth the time listening to it. It did remind me of Holst, particularly the opening measures of The Planets. Thank you for posting that!
Sorrano is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2017, 08:12 PM   #37
Quijote
Senior Member
 
Quijote's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 3,476
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sorrano View Post
Thanks, Don Q! That was well worth the time listening to it. It did remind me of Holst, particularly the opening measures of The Planets. Thank you for posting that!
My pleasure!
Quijote is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2017, 01:57 PM   #38
Chris
Administrator
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 3,303
In the USA we had Name That Tune. That was more about identifying songs, though.

Chris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2017, 02:40 PM   #39
Michael
Senior Member
 
Michael's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Killarney, Ireland
Posts: 3,559
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris View Post
In the USA we had Name That Tune. That was more about identifying songs, though.
You mean identifying the ads?
Michael is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-2017, 10:59 AM   #40
Peter
Administrator
 
Peter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 9,557
Mozart Piano Concerto in C minor - what a great work!
__________________
'Man know thyself'
Peter is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 07:33 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.