The Beethoven Reference Site Forums  

Go Back   The Beethoven Reference Site Forums > General > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 2 votes, 5.00 average. Display Modes
Old 08-23-2017, 08:06 AM   #81
Megan
Senior Member
 
Megan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Land of Hope and Glory
Posts: 1,791
DANGEROUS -Milo Yiannopoulos

__________________
🎹
Megan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2017, 12:20 AM   #82
Quijote
Senior Member
 
Quijote's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 3,502
I have to confess that my reading activity (actual text on real paper) has been very limited of late, I tend to read content on the internet...
That said, I recently read John Irving's Avenue of Mysteries. It took me a while to get into it - I found it frustrating at times - but overall, a satisfying "magical realism" type of novel.
I also have to confess that I'm more into Netflix these days !!
Quijote is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2017, 05:44 PM   #83
Megan
Senior Member
 
Megan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Land of Hope and Glory
Posts: 1,791
Currently reading:
Music in the Castle of Heaven. A portrait of Johann Sebastian Bach.
by, John Eliot Gardiner.
__________________
🎹
Megan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2017, 11:59 PM   #84
Decrepit Poster
Senior Member
 
Decrepit Poster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Mid-South USA
Posts: 354
At 1657 this afternoon, during supper, I concluded my fifth reading of Robert Jordan's A Crown of Swords, book seven of The Wheel of Time. In the past I've felt this to be the volume which began the series' mid-book slump. This time round I noticed little evidence of that, though I did catch slight forewarnings in earlier parts of book six, a volume I previously considered above suspicion. Were I forced single out one plot-line of Crown as being my favorite, I might settle on the search for the Bowl of the Winds in Ebou Dar. That's likely due in large part to it being somewhat Mat centric. Jordan always did right by Mat Cauthon, imo.

I'm now a few pages into book eight, The Path of Daggers.
Decrepit Poster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2017, 07:18 PM   #85
Decrepit Poster
Senior Member
 
Decrepit Poster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Mid-South USA
Posts: 354
At 1135 this morning, just after lunch, I concluded my fourth reading of Robert Jordan's The Path of Daggers, book eight of The Wheel of Time. Next up, Winter's Heart.
Decrepit Poster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2017, 09:46 PM   #86
Quijote
Senior Member
 
Quijote's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 3,502
Struggling with Dante's The Divine Comedy (translated by Clive James, bless him) and Milton's Paradise Lost (in "Plain English" version).
Struggling, because when I care to look down at the pile of books next to my computer, I realize I can't make up any more excuses for not reading all this stuff...
Quijote is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2017, 02:32 PM   #87
Sorrano
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Salt Lake City, UT, USA
Posts: 4,381
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quijote View Post
Struggling with Dante's The Divine Comedy (translated by Clive James, bless him) and Milton's Paradise Lost (in "Plain English" version).
Struggling, because when I care to look down at the pile of books next to my computer, I realize I can't make up any more excuses for not reading all this stuff...
Does Les Miserables happen to be in that stack? That's a good (long) read, as well.
Sorrano is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2017, 07:46 PM   #88
Decrepit Poster
Senior Member
 
Decrepit Poster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Mid-South USA
Posts: 354
At 1139 today, at the tail end of lunch, I finished my fourth reading of Winter's Heart, book nine of Robert Jordan's The Wheel of Time series. An enjoyable entry. As is often the case, my favorite sections were those centered on Mat Cauthon, who has at last found (or been found out by) the Daughter of the Nine Moons. The book's ending wasn't half bad either.

While I still feel that Jordan's best writing is found in books one through six, I've not yet noticed the mid-series slump I detected during prior readings.

Next up, Crossroads of Twilight.

Last edited by Decrepit Poster; 10-30-2017 at 07:49 PM.
Decrepit Poster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2017, 04:28 AM   #89
Harvey
Senior Member
 
Harvey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Metro Detroit Area
Posts: 582
__________________
Quote:
There are no long Wagner operas. Only short attention spans.
Harvey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2017, 06:01 PM   #90
Megan
Senior Member
 
Megan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Land of Hope and Glory
Posts: 1,791



I purchased a beautiful hard back illustrated original , of the A - z of Classical Composers. Brilliant find from a second hand book store.

From the 16th and 17th century through to the classical and romantic periods.
__________________
🎹
Megan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2017, 01:25 AM   #91
Humoresque
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Megan View Post
DANGEROUS -Milo Yiannopoulos

I'm wondering what you thought about this book. Milo is hugely popular, though I don't always agree with him. I don't have the book and haven't read it, but Milo is part of a movement which is pushing back against the regressive Left (a term coined by the excellent Maajid Nawaz). The scolds, nannies, thought police and moral preeners who finger wag and who only thinly disguise their hatred behind 'the mask of compassion' (adroitly defined by the planetary brain of Jordan Peterson). Milo and Professor Jordan Peterson are going to the UK as they have the same issues to deal with in universities, particularly with the "SJWs", as they're called. As Peterson says, "it only takes a couple of dogs to herd a lot of sheep".
Humoresque is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2017, 09:05 PM   #92
Decrepit Poster
Senior Member
 
Decrepit Poster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Mid-South USA
Posts: 354
At 1322 this afternoon I concluded my third reading of Robert Jordan's Crossroads of Twilight, book ten of The Wheel of Time. This is the volume I've, in previous readings, considered the series' weakest. I suppose I still do, though I believe I enjoyed it more this time round. For those who might not remember (or never knew) it covers the "progress" of several separate groups of people from soon before to not long after Rand's struggles to cleanse saidin at the climax of book nine, Winter's Heart. Crossroads is mostly plot development with no great battles or magic duels to speak of. As is so often the case in these mid series books, my favorite section was Mat's, near the end.

Next up, Knife of Dreams, in which Jordan largely redeems himself, producing the most exciting volumes in some time. It is also the final entry written before his death and the beginning of Brandon Sanderson's involvement with the concluding books. Leastwise I've considered it Jordan's redemption in the past. We'll see how it goes this time round.
Decrepit Poster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2017, 07:16 PM   #93
Decrepit Poster
Senior Member
 
Decrepit Poster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Mid-South USA
Posts: 354
At 1238 today I concluded my third reading of Robert Jordan's Knife of Dreams, book eleven of The Wheel of Time. This is Jordan's swansong, his final self-completed series entry prior to an untimely death. It's the volume that, during prior reads, I considered the series' recovery from what I then felt was a mid books slump. This time round I don't so much see those of middle books as lesser quality but rather a deliberate change in tone, less humorous and heroic than their predecessors. Knife merely returns us, to an extent, to the tone of early volume. Or so I now believe. (OK. Not so far as humor is considered. Knife remains pretty bleak.)

I like pretty much every sub-plot in Knife, Egwene - White Tower, Mat - Tuon and so on. As usual, Perrin - Faile held the least interest for me, and even it has its moments.

Next up, the first Jordan-Sanderson volume, The Gathering Storm. From here on out these will be second readings.
Decrepit Poster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2017, 07:44 PM   #94
Decrepit Poster
Senior Member
 
Decrepit Poster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Mid-South USA
Posts: 354
At 1251 today I finished my second reading of The Gathering Storm, book twelve of Robert Jordan's The Wheel of Time series, the first of the final three books Brandon Sanderson completed following Jordan's 2007 death. In his forward, Sanderson states that no one could write the book as well as Jordan himself could have. I was reminded of this time and time again while reading Storm, especially early on. That said, Sanderson does a commendable job. In particular his treatment of Egwene and the White Tower, a focal point of the book, does Jordan proud. Rand is, I think, quite well handled too, though by this stage he is so utterly transformed that comparisons with his former self are largely meaningless. On the other hand Aviendha's brief appearances, she receives almost no coverage here, don't ring true for me.

This book reinforces my newfound belief that the series does NOT slump in the middle but instead merely undergoes dramatic change in "tone." I in no way see this as a bad thing, though I can understand why some of those drawn to the series by the early books' heroics, sense of wonder, and humor might not appreciate what they later morphed into.

I will almost certainly begin book thirteen, Towers of Midnight, by day's end. I doubt I'll finish it before the turn of the year. If so, Storm will be my twenty-first and final completed read of 2017.
Decrepit Poster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2017, 06:07 AM   #95
Megan
Senior Member
 
Megan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Land of Hope and Glory
Posts: 1,791
Gosh DP, you are an avid reader!

My current book is. Point Counter Point, by Aldous Huxley, I have decided to read a few more of his novels.
__________________
🎹
Megan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2018, 05:27 PM   #96
Decrepit Poster
Senior Member
 
Decrepit Poster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Mid-South USA
Posts: 354
​My year of reading - 2017:

This past year is a tough one for me to report on. First off, though as a retiree I've more time to read than in years past, and indeed devoted a fair amount of time to reading, it must be admitted that my thinking processes aren't what they once were, and I was never an overly fast thinker. In consequence, I completed a grand total of only twenty-one novel length books during 2017. Not shabby, but nothing to write home about.

My "favorite new read of the year" is, as occasionally happens, not fantasy but rather a factual book on an aspect of US politics. It shall remain nameless for fear of stirring up discussion of the sort rightly frowned on in this forum.

I read only one fantasy novel new to me last year, though it is by no means a newly published work: "Illusion" by Paula Volsky. It also happens to be the first book I completed in 2017. I enjoyed it, but not to the extent of considering it my "favorite new fantasy read of 2017," an honorific which will remain vacant due to lack of contenders.

My "best re-read of the year" is also a tough call. I re-read both "A Song of Ice and Fire" and "The Wheel of Time" this past year, not yet quite finishing WOT. I'm inclined to give the nod to Wheel, as I feel I've gotten more out of the books this time round than ever before, even changing my stance on its 'mid-books slump,' which as of this reading I no longer believe occurs.

My "disappointment of the year?" No outright winner here either, again due to lack of competition. The novel I enjoyed least was a third reading of Julian May's "The Many-Colored Land." But that's somewhat unfair, as I'm just not much into books with strong sci-fi elements, which Land has/is.

There you have it. I believe the above takes into account every book read during 2017, with the exception of one factual political work.
Decrepit Poster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2018, 04:05 AM   #97
Decrepit Poster
Senior Member
 
Decrepit Poster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Mid-South USA
Posts: 354
At 2102 this evening, 1 Jan 2018, I completed my second reading of the penultimate volume of Robert Jordan's The Wheel of Time series, Towers of Midnight. As with the preceding book, at times I felt Sanderson's handling of certain characters' speech and thoughts not quite in total sync with how I envision Jordan handling them. Despite that, I find Towers a strong series entry. Too, I do not know what writing is pure Sanderson, what pure Jordan, and what a combination of the two. It would be ironic indeed should I learn that the writing I find not quite Jordanesque enough is actually that of the master himself!

My favorite scenario in Towers might well be Aviendha's revelations at Rhuidean. I found Mat and the gang's "visit" to the Tower near book end a bit of a mixed bag. That said, one section of that excursion had my eyes misting, for me a sure sign of a great read.

I'll likely begin the series' final volume, A Memory of Light, shortly. Due to it being near bedtime, I doubt I'll get far before nodding off.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Megan View Post
Gosh DP, you are an avid reader!
I suppose I am, if a rather slow one. As if that matters
Decrepit Poster is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 09:55 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.