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Old 05-19-2001, 04:11 AM   #1
Joy
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Talking Another Beethoven Concert

I'm off tonight to a Beethoven Concert they're performing at one of our Centre for the Arts Building. The program includes:
Opus 10/3 Piano Sonata #7
Opus 110 Piano Sonata #31 and
Opus 57 Piano Sonata #57 (The Appassionata)
I know it's going to be fantastic. I'm really excited about seeing The Appassionata being performed.
Joy
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Old 05-19-2001, 05:08 AM   #2
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Sounds like a great evening, Joy! (Pardon me while I turn green.) Let us know how it turns out.

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Old 06-24-2001, 10:08 AM   #3
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Great recital program, who was the pianist??
Beethoven's Sonata in F Minor, Op. 57 is definately one of the greatest piano sonatas ever written. I am currently working on the piece, and I would agree.
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Old 06-24-2001, 10:30 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally posted by LudwigVBeethoven:
Great recital program, who was the pianist??
Beethoven's Sonata in F Minor, Op. 57 is definately one of the greatest piano sonatas ever written. I am currently working on the piece, and I would agree.
I would agree with you.
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Old 06-24-2001, 02:54 PM   #5
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Originally posted by Immortal Beloved:
I would agree with you.
And I agree with you



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Old 06-24-2001, 03:22 PM   #6
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And I agree with you
I agree with both of you (this topic could run & run).............
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Old 06-25-2001, 01:12 AM   #7
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And I agree with you

Cool! *high fives*
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Old 06-25-2001, 02:04 AM   #8
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Originally posted by LudwigVBeethoven:
Great recital program, who was the pianist??
Beethoven's Sonata in F Minor, Op. 57 is definately one of the greatest piano sonatas ever written. I am currently working on the piece, and I would agree.
The pianist is Caio Pagano. He is one of the music professors here at Arizona State University. They were giving a free concert in the music hall. They give a lot of free concerts here. He played it fantastically. The people gave him a standing ovation.


I have since learned that Caio Pagano is making a concert tour of the United States this summer and will return to his duties on the board of director's this fall at AZ University.
Joy

[This message has been edited by Joy (edited 06-27-2001).]
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Old 06-25-2001, 02:38 PM   #9
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Whenever I play the beginning of the Appassionata, it reminds me of the beginning of the (American) National Anthem. Does anyone else hear that? You know, that part that goes "Oh say can you see...?"
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Old 06-25-2001, 03:46 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally posted by LudwigVBeethoven:
Great recital program, who was the pianist??
Beethoven's Sonata in F Minor, Op. 57 is definately one of the greatest piano sonatas ever written. I am currently working on the piece, and I would agree.
Hello,
Glenn Gould would not have agreed with you. For him (TV interview) the Appassionata was utterly ridiculous, a piece of crap and he tried to prove his point by a performance which ai would describe as a nasty, mischievous caricature.

I do not know why he felt compelled to do so.
However, the work tends to be misunderstood more often than other piano sonatas; I heard very few good performances (as is with the Hammerklavier sonata) compared to other LvB piano sonatas.

It is one of my LvB favourites.
Greets,
Bernhard
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Old 06-25-2001, 07:29 PM   #11
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Now that you mention it, Chris, I do hear a connection..... Look! There's a cow that looks like Elvis!!!!!



Gould was somewhat unusual, in that he almost never liked anything that didn't have counterpoint in it. He was obsessed with counterpoint. He once stated that he thought that this one Mozart symphony was terrible, except for a brief section of the last movement where there happens to be counterpoint.

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Old 06-25-2001, 08:15 PM   #12
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Originally posted by Bob the Composer:
Now that you mention it, Chris, I do hear a connection..... Look! There's a cow that looks like Elvis!!!!!



Gould was somewhat unusual, in that he almost never liked anything that didn't have counterpoint in it. He was obsessed with counterpoint. He once stated that he thought that this one Mozart symphony was terrible, except for a brief section of the last movement where there happens to be counterpoint.

Bob
I presume this most 'unusual' character's favourite was thus Bach? In the one disk of his I have of B's music (variations op34 & 35) he plays as if the whole thing is a joke, and sings throughout! I suppose Gould was classical music's first buffoon, whose jester's hat is now in the posession of 'Kennedy'.



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Old 06-26-2001, 03:20 PM   #13
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What a concert !
Naturally, opus 110 and opus 57 are gigantic, but I do appreciate highly the 2d mouvement opus opus 10 n°3, with so deep feelings in it....

Glenn GOULD... well, for me he has not always had had his full mind anyway : I do not understand people who put him on the top.
He does not bring me nothing and anyway has nothing to do with BEETHOVEN !!! Sorry if it hurts some of you....

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Old 06-26-2001, 04:24 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally posted by Claudie MICAULT:
What a concert !
Naturally, opus 110 and opus 57 are gigantic, but I do appreciate highly the 2d mouvement opus opus 10 n°3, with so deep feelings in it....

Glenn GOULD... well, for me he has not always had had his full mind anyway : I do not understand people who put him on the top.
He does not bring me nothing and anyway has nothing to do with BEETHOVEN !!! Sorry if it hurts some of you....

I agree entirely - I'm not too keen on his Bach either, which for me is too clinical.
Dinu Lipati was a greater artist in my estimation - his early death being a tragic loss to music.

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Old 06-27-2001, 05:12 PM   #15
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I feel happy with your remark : for me too GOULD's BACH is too "clinical" (you have found the right word !!!)
And Dinu LIPATTI !!! I am a fan of him. I have all the old recordings....
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Old 06-27-2001, 09:11 PM   #16
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Originally posted by Claudie MICAULT:
I feel happy with your remark : for me too GOULD's BACH is too "clinical" (you have found the right word !!!)
And Dinu LIPATTI !!! I am a fan of him. I have all the old recordings....
Gould is a classic example of an artist being controlled by the recording studio, rather than relating to a live audience. By contrast, isn't it wonderful to listen to Lipatti's last live recording - so sad to think he was seriously ill at the time, yet no hint of it in his playing.

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Old 06-28-2001, 01:55 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally posted by Claudie MICAULT:
I feel happy with your remark : for me too GOULD's BACH is too "clinical" (you have found the right word !!!)
And Dinu LIPATTI !!! I am a fan of him. I have all the old recordings....
Well, I personally wouldn't blame Gould too much in this respect, I find Bach rather clinical even in the best of hands - he could have done with a little more of the human touch in his works, but perhaps this is not the Cantor's way. Of course you don't have to look too far to find the most glorious humanity in Baroque music...enter Mr H!!

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Old 06-28-2001, 10:44 PM   #18
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Yes Rod, I also prefer H. in his vocal music, but I must say I love Bachs's organ and piano works played in a non-mechanical way. If somebody is able to give a sense to a singing line, Bach becomes also interesting and there are singing lines in Bach.... The problem is that a lot of pianists play Bach as "typewriters" and in an intellectual way. Here in Saarbrücken we have the BACH COMPETITION... Well, this year won an Italian with good fingers... but totally unsensible. That put Bach down.
I think for B. and Chopin who studied seriously the "CLAVECIN BIEN TEMPÉRÉ" Bach was also music. B. and Chopin were not at all "typewriters pianists" and that gives an idea about how Bach could be played....

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Old 06-29-2001, 12:24 AM   #19
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Originally posted by Claudie MICAULT:
Yes Rod, I also prefer H. in his vocal music, but I must say I love Bachs's organ and piano works played in a non-mechanical way. If somebody is able to give a sense to a singing line, Bach becomes also interesting and there are singing lines in Bach.... The problem is that a lot of pianists play Bach as "typewriters" and in an intellectual way. Here in Saarbrücken we have the BACH COMPETITION... Well, this year won an Italian with good fingers... but totally unsensible. That put Bach down.
I think for B. and Chopin who studied seriously the "CLAVECIN BIEN TEMPÉRÉ" Bach was also music. B. and Chopin were not at all "typewriters pianists" and that gives an idea about how Bach could be played....

I absolutely agree - Bach's music is so expressive and should sing. So many pianists plod through the preludes and fugues, no wonder the music seems dull - I guarantee it is the fault of the pianist not the composer!

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Old 03-13-2017, 11:50 PM   #20
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Saturday Night I attended Beethoven's Missa Solemnis at Hill Auditorium on the campus of the University of Michigan. It was wonderful. All the soloists were very good but IMO the tenor was not the greatest (but I am hard to please liking very few tenors, Florez and Kaufmann being among the few I really like):

Erin Wall (soprano)
Kelly O'Connor (mezzo-soprano)
Matthew Plenk (tenor)
Nathan Stark (bass)
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Old 03-14-2017, 12:20 PM   #21
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This thread covers sixteen years!!!
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Old 03-15-2017, 02:30 AM   #22
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This thread covers sixteen years!!!
Or went missing for 15 years!
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Old 03-15-2017, 11:40 AM   #23
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Or went missing for 15 years!
It just proves that what you put up on the internet stays there!
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Old 03-15-2017, 05:14 PM   #24
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It just proves that what you put up on the internet stays there!
It just proves that whatever you do, it stays there. (Sorry for getting philosophical...)
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