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Luis
12-14-2000, 07:22 AM
Is there a philosophical meaning in Beethoven fascination with Prometheus? (Greek God who stolen the sacred fire from the Gods to give it to the men) Was B thinking in men as owners of their destiny and responsible of their own actions and, as a result of this, truly free. I havenít seen the ballet. How this subject is treated? What about the French Revolution? Did B thought about it as an act or example of this emancipation?

PS: Have you seen Evil Advocate? Good film!

Rod
12-14-2000, 09:28 AM
Originally posted by Luis:
Is there a philosophical meaning in Beethoven fascination with Prometheus? (Greek God who stolen the sacred fire from the Gods to give it to the men) Was B thinking in men as owners of their destiny and responsible of their own actions and, as a result of this, truly free. I havenít seen the ballet. How this subject is treated? What about the French Revolution? Did B thought about it as an act or example of this emancipation?


B certainly believed people are the masters of their own destiny, though this did not prevent him from begging God to improve his lot in life on occasion. I haven't seen the ballet either, mainly because I don't think anyone has bothered to resurect it on stage. The only idea we have of what went on is from a surviving programme, which doesn't say much. The music is certainly underrated. If one listens to the CD directed by Frans Bruggen on Phillips, the best recording by a significant margin, there are some really great numbers. This is lively Beethoven, the march mid-way through is one of the most exhilarating pieces of music you will ever hear (at least in Bruggen's hands). Any new performance would probably bear little, if any, resemblance to the original production by Vigano. I'm sure B could have identified with Prometheus to a certain extent, or at least found this hero appealing.

Rod

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"If I were but of noble birth..." - Rod Corkin

Peter
12-14-2000, 02:13 PM
Originally posted by Luis:
Is there a philosophical meaning in Beethoven fascination with Prometheus? (Greek God who stolen the sacred fire from the Gods to give it to the men) Was B thinking in men as owners of their destiny and responsible of their own actions and, as a result of this, truly free. I havenít seen the ballet. How this subject is treated? What about the French Revolution? Did B thought about it as an act or example of this emancipation?

PS: Have you seen Evil Advocate? Good film!

Beethoven certainly was attracted to the heroic in music - one of his first major works was the cantata on the death of Joseph II - the reforming emperor who B admired.
In the Creatures of Prometheus B uses a theme which he had already used as a German dance,re-cycled again in the Prometheus variations and of course in the finale of the Eroica Symphony - (the last movement of which was the first to be sketched) - so there is no doubt B identified very strongly with this theme.

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'Man know thyself'

PDG
12-14-2000, 09:21 PM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Rod:
[B] B certainly believed people are the masters of their own destiny, though this did not prevent him from begging God to improve his lot in life on occasion. I haven't seen the ballet either, mainly because I don't think anyone has bothered to resurect it on stage.>>

Well, the ballet certainly HAS been resurrected during this century - most recently , I believe, by Frederick Ashton; although how he compensated for the gaps in the intended telling of the tale, I have no idea.

Rod
12-15-2000, 06:29 AM
Originally posted by PDG:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Rod:
[B]
Well, the ballet certainly HAS been resurrected during this century - most recently , I believe, by Frederick Ashton; although how he compensated for the gaps in the intended telling of the tale, I have no idea.

Well, this is good news. Frankly I don't give a damn about what would be goin on on stage, ballet is not particularly my scene (I'm too macho). Just as long as they get the music right! Given the severe lack of good ballet music, I'm surprised it has not been resurrected earlier.

Rod

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"If I were but of noble birth..." - Rod Corkin

Chris
12-15-2000, 06:33 AM
But Rod - we've got all that great Tchaikovsky ballet music... http://www.gyrix.com/~cgraye/ubb/wink.gif

Rod
12-17-2000, 02:30 PM
Originally posted by Chris:
But Rod - we've got all that great Tchaikovsky ballet music... http://www.gyrix.com/~cgraye/ubb/wink.gif

I refer the honourable gentleman to my earlier remark...

Rod

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"If I were but of noble birth..." - Rod Corkin