PDA

View Full Version : Romantic violin concertos


Luis
11-15-2000, 06:04 AM
One of the classical musical genres taken by Beethoven until an unprecedented point until him was violin concerto. But in this case, in my opinion at least, on the contrary that with the symphonies or the piano sonatas, the composers that came after him obtained considerable results. The concerts of Bahms, Mendelssohn, Tchaikovsky, Dvorak and Sibelius are patent proves of that.
Until one week ago I had not been able to mention one as being standing out from the rest. But recently I listened Paganiniís first and I was pleasurably surprised. This is undoubtedly the one that more disjoints within those mentioned and itís the first after Bís. (Itíhas been written between 1811 and 1815 and wasnít published until after Paganiniís death in 1840.)
Qualitative comparisons here are rather difficult to establish since it hardly be described as a ďromanticĒ concerto but for only the remarkable virtuosism. Although itís far the less solemn, than the others, that lacks of any synphonism, that virtually has not orchestral thematic development opposed to the violin, and that in fact, seems a huge concatenation of cadenzas, this concert, specially on itís first movement, explodes better than any of the others the sensuality of the violin sound. It is curious but the scarce orchestration seems coming from a Rossini opera and one can imagine the amusing aria in which the violin represents the rol of a woman full of personality and humor that on a flirting game enjoys herself developing all her charms. She insinuates, shows off, seduces, blushes, etc.

Anyway, I wanted to talk about the other concertos!: Their relation to Beethovenís. What do you think on them? Do you have any favorite? Am I missing any?

PSs:
1) Have you heard other Paganiniís concertos? I know he has 6 but Iíve only listened this No. 1 so far.
2) (Totally off topic!) Have you seen Comte Ory, the Rossini opera? Iíve never had so much fun seeing an opera!

greetings, Luis


[This message has been edited by Luis (edited 11-15-2000).]

Chris
11-15-2000, 06:49 AM
The Tchaikovsky and the Mendelssohn are my favorite Romantic violin concertos. In fact, hearing the Tchaikovsky concerto was what really got me into "classical" music and also got me taking my violin playing more seriously. I probably owe my whole love of Beethoven to the Tchaikovsky concerto, in fact.

Serge
11-15-2000, 07:10 AM
I remember reading somewhere once that the Beethoven concerto was the most often played and about the most respected if not popular one of the genre. I think it deserves a lot of its praise even though apparently B. had a little difficulty in properly writing for the violin solo. The 1st movt repeats its theme a lot, I find, but it's such a beautiful melody I don't find it a problem.
The Tchaikovsky is very nice, indeed, but I must also include Schumann's Violin Fantasy among my preferences in this category.

Rod
11-15-2000, 01:10 PM
Originally posted by Serge:
I remember reading somewhere once that the Beethoven concerto was the most often played and about the most respected if not popular one of the genre. I think it deserves a lot of its praise even though apparently B. had a little difficulty in properly writing for the violin solo. The 1st movt repeats its theme a lot, I find, but it's such a beautiful melody I don't find it a problem.
The Tchaikovsky is very nice, indeed, but I must also include Schumann's Violin Fantasy among my preferences in this category.

Initially B's violin concerto was a total failure and it wasn't until some time later that it became accepted in the repertoire, and then generally accepted as the greatest work of its kind. The problem you mention with the repetition in first movement is primarily a result, in my opinion, of the extremely ponderous tempo that is typically used for this movement. Allegro ma non troppo is not a particularly a moderate tempo for Beethoven at least. This movement is proof of that (and there are others). The repetition does not become an issue when one hears the piece played in a swifter, generally more stricter manner. I don't consider recordings unless the first movement is less than 23 minutes - this rules out 98% - including a reasonable cadenza. I believe also the swifter tempi overall for this work would make the piano version far more palatable and justifiable.

Rod

------------------
"If I were but of noble birth..." - Rod Corkin

Peter
11-15-2000, 07:37 PM
Originally posted by Rod:
Initially B's violin concerto was a total failure and it wasn't until some time later that it became accepted in the repertoire, and then generally accepted as the greatest work of its kind. The problem you mention with the repetition in first movement is primarily a result, in my opinion, of the extremely ponderous tempo that is typically used for this movement.
Rod


I think the B violin concerto received very few performances durind his lifetime.
Interesting about the first movement tempo - virtually every violinist drops the tempo in the 'romantic ' G min section - sometimes drastically, though no such indication is written in the score.

------------------
'Man know thyself'

Peter
11-16-2000, 10:26 PM
Originally posted by Luis:

Anyway, I wanted to talk about the other concertos!: Their relation to Beethovenís. What do you think on them? Do you have any favorite? Am I missing any?

PSs:
1) Have you heard other Paganiniís concertos? I know he has 6 but Iíve only listened this No. 1 so far.
2) (Totally off topic!) Have you seen Comte Ory, the Rossini opera? Iíve never had so much fun seeing an opera!

greetings, Luis


[This message has been edited by Luis (edited 11-15-2000).]

You didn't mention the Bruch no.1 or the Elgar (which I particularly like).
Incidentally one of the Paganini concertos (in B minor I think) is nick-named 'the Bell' and Liszt's famous virtuoso piece 'la Campanella' is based on the main theme.

Rossini's operas are fun - I've seen 2, 'La Cenerentola' and 'Ermione' (which I thought was fine) - not in Fidelio's league obviously, before I get accused !!!

------------------
'Man know thyself'