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View Full Version : Serenade in D, op. 25


PDG
01-09-2001, 07:44 PM
What a thoroughly charming work is the serenade for flute, violin & viola, in D, opus 25! We know that Beethoven was very fond of it for he took the trouble to personally correct the unauthorised arrangement of it for piano & violin, op.41. Unless I`m wrong, op.25 was his last-written work for wind & strings - what a pity.

I am unaware of any detestation on Beethoven`s part, for the flute, as there was with Mozart, so I wonder why he stopped writing such elegant works so early in his career (1801)? The aristocracy must have loved new pieces which they themselves could play, without having to hire, for example, entire orchestras to hear a new work. And, of course, Beethoven had many aristocratic, musically-capable friends. Did they stop asking him to supply them with appropriate pieces? If their requests were forthcoming, is it that Beethoven simply couldn`t be bothered with them? Since he obviously had a certain affection for op.25, it does seem odd to me that he never again wrote for either this or a similar combination of chamber instruments.

Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Peter
01-10-2001, 05:23 AM
Originally posted by PDG:


I am unaware of any detestation on Beethoven`s part, for the flute, as there was with Mozart, so I wonder why he stopped writing such elegant works so early in his career (1801)?



I can't remeber, was it the flute or the oboe that Mozart disliked ? - after all he wrote several flute concertos. I know he loved the clarinet.Getting back to B, wouldn't it have been wonderful if he'd given us at least one woodwind concerto!

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'Man know thyself'

Rod
01-10-2001, 08:48 AM
Originally posted by PDG:
What a thoroughly charming work is the serenade for flute, violin & viola, in D, opus 25! We know that Beethoven was very fond of it for he took the trouble to personally correct the unauthorised arrangement of it for piano & violin, op.41. Unless I`m wrong, op.25 was his last-written work for wind & strings - what a pity.

I am unaware of any detestation on Beethoven`s part, for the flute, as there was with Mozart, so I wonder why he stopped writing such elegant works so early in his career (1801)? The aristocracy must have loved new pieces which they themselves could play, without having to hire, for example, entire orchestras to hear a new work. And, of course, Beethoven had many aristocratic, musically-capable friends. Did they stop asking him to supply them with appropriate pieces? If their requests were forthcoming, is it that Beethoven simply couldn`t be bothered with them? Since he obviously had a certain affection for op.25, it does seem odd to me that he never again wrote for either this or a similar combination of chamber instruments.

Any thoughts would be appreciated.



I recall reading that B was once asked why he did not write more music for the flute. His reply was that the instrument was not sufficiantly developed (I presume technically).

Rod


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"If I were but of noble birth..." - Rod Corkin

Rod
01-10-2001, 08:49 AM
Originally posted by Peter:
I can't remeber, was it the flute or the oboe that Mozart disliked ? - after all he wrote several flute concertos. I know he loved the clarinet.Getting back to B, wouldn't it have been wonderful if he'd given us at least one woodwind concerto!


He did, but we lost it - his early oboe concerto.

Rod

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"If I were but of noble birth..." - Rod Corkin

PDG
01-10-2001, 12:42 PM
Peter,

It was definitely the flute which Mozart described as "an instrument I cannot bear."

Rod,

Apart from a reference made to it in a letter by Haydn, is there any evidence that Beethoven`s Oboe Concerto either ever existed or was ever finished?

Rod
01-10-2001, 01:27 PM
Originally posted by PDG:
Peter,

It was definitely the flute which Mozart described as "an instrument I cannot bear."

Rod,

Apart from a reference made to it in a letter by Haydn, is there any evidence that Beethoven`s Oboe Concerto either ever existed or was ever finished?

You can find out more about this piece (Oboe Concerto in F major, Hess 12) on the concertos link in the home page of this site, written by my good self.

Rod


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"If I were but of noble birth..." - Rod Corkin

Michael
01-10-2001, 02:21 PM
You can hear a few fragments of the Oboe Concerto on the Unheard Beethoven site.

Michael

PDG
04-28-2001, 04:46 PM
I've hauled this back up the boards because it ties in with Peter's post about Beethoven's public appearance.

Another flute work, the trio for flute, bassoon & piano, WoO 37 comes from B's late teenage years in Bonn. He carefully signed himself as "organist to His Highness the Prince Elector of Cologne" at the foot of the work's manuscript. This really was the springtime of Ludwig's life; everything looked possible for him - the world was his oyster! - & his self-confidence & youthful positiveness was shown not only in his charming chamber music, but also in his dress sense. His usual attire consisted of trimmed waistcoat, blue tails, shoes decorated with ribbons & a dashing tricorne hat. It really does conjure quite an image!

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PDG (Peter)

Rod
04-28-2001, 07:37 PM
Originally posted by PDG:
I've hauled this back up the boards because it ties in with Peter's post about Beethoven's public appearance.

Another flute work, the trio for flute, bassoon & piano, WoO 37 comes from B's late teenage years in Bonn. He carefully signed himself as "organist to His Highness the Prince Elector of Cologne" at the foot of the work's manuscript. This really was the springtime of Ludwig's life; everything looked possible for him - the world was his oyster! - & his self-confidence & youthful positiveness was shown not only in his charming chamber music, but also in his dress sense. His usual attire consisted of trimmed waistcoat, blue tails, shoes decorated with ribbons & a dashing tricorne hat. It really does conjure quite an image!



I like this trio (WoO37), played with a genuine con brio, the first movement especially is most effective.

Regarding B's appearance, yes it seems B was quite a dandy in his younger days, still free from the ravages of time and truth!

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"If I were but of noble birth..." - Rod Corkin