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BP
10-04-2000, 01:21 AM
This symphony, (especially the first 4-8 notes) are very prevelent in todays society. Almost everywhere one goes, it is possible to hear this symphony. The American TV channel NBC once ran an ad using the opening of the 4th movement, but most of the time, it is the first movement of the symphony that is used. The Simpsons (a TV show), perhaps to make light of this, once had an answering maching burst forth with the 5th to the words "Nobody's here". Many other such word settings exist, and this symphony is often used in instrumental form too (most recently in a severely cut down version on Disney's Fantasia 2000).

I am very curious as to how a simple 4-8 notes could have become so prevelent in our society. Would anyone liket to talk about their opinions of this?

BP

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Freedom is Slavery
Ignorance is Strength
War is peace

Peter
10-04-2000, 11:05 AM
Well those opening bars are pretty striking and dramatic - Once heard, never forgotten - and that is exactly as Beethoven intended, as he goes on to construct the whole movement out of this Rhythmic cell. The symbolism of the opening four notes was used in the 2nd world war, as in Morse code ...- is the letter V, famously used by Churchill as the victory sign. Ironically this whole work - by a German composer , became a symbol of the struggle against the Germans - such is the power of Beethoven - his message is for all humanity and it is one of freedom and the end of tyranny.

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'Man know thyself'

Suzie
10-04-2000, 04:11 PM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by BP:
[B]
This symphony, (especially the first 4-8 notes) are very prevelent in todays society. Almost everywhere one goes, it is possible to hear this symphony. The American TV channel NBC once ran an ad using the opening of the 4th movement, but most of the time, it is the first movement of the symphony that is used. The Simpsons (a TV show), perhaps to make light of this, once had an answering maching burst forth with the 5th to the words "Nobody's here". Many other such word settings exist, and this symphony is often used in instrumental form too (most recently in a severely cut down version on Disney's Fantasia 2000).

I am very curious as to how a simple 4-8 notes could have become so prevelent in our society. Would anyone liket to talk about their opinions of this?

BP

It's just really, really good, Bob!

Kevin
10-04-2000, 07:11 PM
I think the 4-8 notes you refer to have a profound archetypal significance that transcends surface analysis. It is a sound image that resonates with much of humanity and our common experience with life, fate and death. Most people don't realize that there is much more to this symphony as a whole, as well as in the total first movement. Some have argued that this is Beethoven's most accessible music, not requiring any background to understand it. Also, keep in mind the variance in peformance quality in both live accounts and recordings of this symphony is great. ["The fundament upon which all of our knowledge is based is the inexplicable"]Originally posted by BP:

This symphony, (especially the first 4-8 notes) are very prevelent in todays society. Almost everywhere one goes, it is possible to hear this symphony. The American TV channel NBC once ran an ad using the opening of the 4th movement, but most of the time, it is the first movement of the symphony that is used. The Simpsons (a TV show), perhaps to make light of this, once had an answering maching burst forth with the 5th to the words "Nobody's here". Many other such word settings exist, and this symphony is often used in instrumental form too (most recently in a severely cut down version on Disney's Fantasia 2000).

I am very curious as to how a simple 4-8 notes could have become so prevelent in our society. Would anyone liket to talk about their opinions of this?

BP

[/QUOTE]

Rod
10-04-2000, 08:45 PM
As has been said, these notes have become so engrained in western culture (at least) that it is almost impossible to listen to the music in isolation of this fact, as one can do with the lesser known works.

Regarding accessibility, by Beethoven's standards the symphonies are surely his most accessible works as a genre, whilst still being embewed with the same intellectual strength, sincerity, and structural certainty that are trademarks of all of B's music.

Rod

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"If I were but of noble birth..." - Rod Corkin