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MCS
03-04-2001, 05:24 AM
I've been seriously listening to Beethoven for nearly a year now and it seems to me that there is something about his music that is habit-forming...I mean, I've liked the music of other composers for some time, but never felt compelled to look beyond a favorite work or two.'The Planets', which I enjoy, didn't cause me to become Holst-obssessed. But then I heard the 9th and my ears were opened! I saw the light! First, I went out and got my own copy of the 9th (Abbado, Berlin Philharmonic), and that of course lead me to the other symphonies. But, after a while, that alone wouldn't do so I had to investigate the sonatas, then concertos, overtures, more sonatas...And then, before I know it, I'm checking out websites and message boards...That never happened with Pergolesi...And now I'm constantly trolling around to see what to investigate next....(And I must say this is an excellent location for just such a pasttime!) On the PBS documentary on Beethoven, one professor said his music is addictive. I fear it's too late for me, but others should be made aware!!...Perhaps there should be warning labels on the CDs?
Are there others out there similarly afflicted? We could form a self-help group...

Chris
03-04-2001, 05:40 AM
Hmmm..."Beethovenians Anonymous"?

Serge
03-04-2001, 08:00 AM
If Beethoven is addictive, and it is, then it is a drug we should be encouraging the proliferation of.

Peter
03-04-2001, 10:47 AM
Originally posted by MCS:
Perhaps there should be warning labels on the CDs?
Are there others out there similarly afflicted?

The only warning I'd put on the label would be 'Beware: this music could seriously damage your appreciation of pop - only advisable for those capable of concentrating for more than 30 seconds.' !!

We could form a self-help group...

This is it!

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'Man know thyself'

PDG
03-04-2001, 03:15 PM
There can be no doubt that his music is addictive. Maybe we keep going back to it because we hope that the next time we listen the "whole truth" will emerge; but it never does, so back again we go.

Funny, but although I`ve known people to start off liking Mozart or Bach or Rachmaninov (yuk) or other composers, & then gravitate towards Beethoven from them, I`ve never known this situation in reverse. In other words, I can`t even imagine, one day, meeting someone who might say, "Well, I USED to like Beethoven, but now I like Brahms." On the classical appreciation journey, Beethoven is the end of the road.

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Peter (PDG)

Peter
03-04-2001, 05:28 PM
Originally posted by PDG:

Funny, but although I`ve known people to start off liking Mozart or Bach or Rachmaninov (yuk) or other composers, & then gravitate towards Beethoven from them, I`ve never known this situation in reverse. In other words, I can`t even imagine, one day, meeting someone who might say, "Well, I USED to like Beethoven, but now I like Brahms." On the classical appreciation journey, Beethoven is the end of the road.



I started off from a Beethoven only position and then discovered other great composers - he was the gateway for me into 'Classical music' and as much as I love and admire many other composers, B still remains at the centre of my affections.

P.S I don't find Rachmaninov yuk! The 2nd Symphony is great stuff , likewise the Paganini variations. The Preludes are also great fun to play. My definition of Yuk would have to be Harrison-Birtwhistle !

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'Man know thyself'

Ludwigvan
03-04-2001, 06:00 PM
I started out with Beethoven too and he will always be very special for me.
Have any of you be fortunate enough to visit Beethovenhaus in Bonn? The day I gor there (a Saturday) it closed at noon so I only saw the outside. Next time, I'll be sure to get inside.

Peter
03-04-2001, 06:34 PM
Originally posted by Ludwigvan:
I started out with Beethoven too and he will always be very special for me.
Have any of you be fortunate enough to visit Beethovenhaus in Bonn? The day I gor there (a Saturday) it closed at noon so I only saw the outside. Next time, I'll be sure to get inside.

I visited it 20 years ago and I remember having to wait an hour or so for it to open in the afternoon as well! On the same holiday I also visited the Mozart birthplace in Salzburg and quite a few Beethoven sites in Vienna as well - A repeat visit is called for!

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'Man know thyself'

PDG
03-04-2001, 06:54 PM
Fancy going all that way only to find it closed!!

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Peter (PDG)

PDG
03-04-2001, 07:04 PM
Originally posted by Peter:
I started off from a Beethoven only position and then discovered other great composers - he was the gateway for me into 'Classical music' and as much as I love and admire many other composers, B still remains at the centre of my affections.
P.S I don't find Rachmaninov yuk! The 2nd Symphony is great stuff , likewise the Paganini variations. The Preludes are also great fun to play. My definition of Yuk would have to be Harrison-Birtwhistle !


Peter, I meant people who lose interest in one composer, as they move on to another. I`ve yet to meet anyone "into" Beethoven who later lost the addiction.

Re: Rachmaninov. Beethoven is Premier League, Rach is 3rd Division, & Harrison-Birtwhistle (any relation, Peter? http://www.gyrix.com/~cgraye/ubb/biggrin.gif) is GM Vauxhall Conference (no offence to the GMVC).

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Peter (PDG)

Serge
03-04-2001, 07:59 PM
Originally posted by PDG:
There can be no doubt that his music is addictive. Maybe we keep going back to it because we hope that the next time we listen the "whole truth" will emerge; but it never does, so back again we go.

Funny, but although I`ve known people to start off liking Mozart or Bach or Rachmaninov (yuk) or other composers, & then gravitate towards Beethoven from them, I`ve never known this situation in reverse. In other words, I can`t even imagine, one day, meeting someone who might say, "Well, I USED to like Beethoven, but now I like Brahms." On the classical appreciation journey, Beethoven is the end of the road.




Truer words have not been spoken.

MCS
03-04-2001, 09:44 PM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Peter:
[B] The only warning I'd put on the label would be 'Beware: this music could seriously damage your appreciation of pop - only advisable for those capable of concentrating for more than 30 seconds.' !!

Ain't it the truth! My tolerance for my daughter's music is diminishing in direct proportion to my admiration of B....Perhaps after listening to B.'s music, your mind searches for things in pop music that just aren't there?

Peter
03-04-2001, 11:45 PM
Originally posted by PDG:
Peter, I meant people who lose interest in one composer, as they move on to another. I`ve yet to meet anyone "into" Beethoven who later lost the addiction.

And I agree!

Re: Rachmaninov. Beethoven is Premier League, Rach is 3rd Division, & Harrison-Birtwhistle (any relation, Peter? http://www.gyrix.com/~cgraye/ubb/biggrin.gif) is GM Vauxhall Conference (no offence to the GMVC).



Fortunately not! The Birtwhistle appendage is a completely different strain altogether!

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'Man know thyself'

[This message has been edited by Peter (edited 03-04-2001).]

Michael
03-05-2001, 01:38 AM
To say that Beethoven is addictive is sheer and utter nonsense! I am a Beethoven fan and yet, on Tuesday last, I managed to last three hours without listening to him.

Michael

Suzie
03-05-2001, 03:02 AM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Michael:
[B]To say that Beethoven is addictive is sheer and utter nonsense! I am a Beethoven fan and yet, on Tuesday last, I managed to last three hours without listening to him.

Michael

You are in total denial, Michael!

Suz

Peter
03-05-2001, 08:49 AM
I wonder if B's Dec 22nd 1808 concert (Symphonies Nos.5&6,parts of Mass in C,Piano concerto No.4,Choral fantasia,'Ah Perfido')
might be considered as an over-dose by today's standards! Anyone suffering can contribute the going Hollwywood rate of 20,000 per week for such addictions to the Beethoven Reference Site Fund !

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'Man know thyself'

PDG
03-05-2001, 09:49 AM
Originally posted by Peter:

I wonder if B's Dec 22nd 1808 concert (Symphonies Nos.5&6,parts of Mass in C,Piano concerto No.4,Choral fantasia,'Ah Perfido')
might be considered as an over-dose by today's standards!


Maybe, but oh.....to have been there.....

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Peter (PDG)

PDG
03-05-2001, 07:31 PM
Originally posted by Suzie:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Michael:
[B]To say that Beethoven is addictive is sheer and utter nonsense! I am a Beethoven fan and yet, on Tuesday last, I managed to last three hours without listening to him.
Michael
You are in total denial, Michael!
Suz


Michael`s not in denial, Suzie, but he is close to the Liffey! http://www.gyrix.com/~cgraye/ubb/rolleyes.gif

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Peter (PDG)

Michael
03-06-2001, 02:32 AM
Originally posted by PDG:
Michael`s not in denial, Suzie, but he is close to the Liffey! http://www.gyrix.com/~cgraye/ubb/rolleyes.gif



Any more puns like that and I'll throw myself in the Liffey!
(I am now attempting the roll eyes face for the first time, folks - it may not work)
http://www.gyrix.com/~cgraye/ubb/rolleyes.gif

Michael

Michael
03-06-2001, 02:33 AM
Wow! It works!
http://www.gyrix.com/~cgraye/ubb/rolleyes.gif

Roehre
11-15-2009, 08:08 PM
I visited it 20 years ago and I remember having to wait an hour or so for it to open in the afternoon as well!

It has much changed the last couple of years, reacting to the fact that Bonn is not the Federal capital of Germany anymore, and that subsidies have been cut dramatically. The out sourcing of all publications to Clarus Publishers (thereby in the process producing a negligible number of the Bonner Beethoven Studien 3, now even 2nd hands not to get hold on...), and the introduction of all kind of Beethoven merchandise in the renovated shop, are an exponent of this development as well.

But: is Beethoven addictive?
There are some composers of whom I listened to a big part (or nearly all) of their output, and which caused some kind of withdrawal symptoms as I stopped.

Beethoven was definitely one of them, as was Schumann, Brahms, Wagner, Bruckner, Mahler, Sibelius, Stravinsky, Bartok, Berg, Webern, Puccini, Messiaen, Bloch, Vaughan Williams, Martinu, Shostakovich. Composers whose works were not addictive (for me at least) are Bach, Mozart, Chopin, Handel, Mendelssohn, Tchaikovsky, Verdi, Prokofjev, Britten, Walton.

Why?
Haven't a clue.

AeolianHarp
12-03-2013, 03:24 AM
Yes indeed he is- I am beyond help really and revelling in it.:p

Michael
12-03-2013, 04:40 PM
I was halfway down this thread before I realised it was twelve years old!
Well, I can honestly say that my addiction (started at Easter in 1968) is worse than ever, thankfully!
Even when this forum started in 2001, I could never visualise a day when all the music -and any information you could possibly want about Beethoven - would be available at the touch of a mouse.

Chris
12-03-2013, 04:45 PM
Wow, I posted in this thread when I was only a few days out of my teens!

AeolianHarp
12-03-2013, 04:51 PM
I was halfway down this thread before I realised it was twelve years old!
Well, I can honestly say that my addiction (started at Easter in 1968) is worse than ever, thankfully!
Even when this forum started in 2001, I could never visualise a day when all the music -and any information you could possibly want about Beethoven - would be available at the touch of a mouse.

I thought as I am new on here I'd like to see the archives and resurrect some old threads- new blood and all that.:p

Michael your addiction started just 3 months before I was born! I think we can safely say you are past curing now. I expect ypu must have quiet an interesting collection- LPs too I presume? I have some LPS, just need to get a record player!

Same here re the internet/computer stuff- I can still remember first encountering the internet and being bemused by it all. None of us could have imagined how integral it would become. It does tend to make the addiction easy to feed doesn't it! :p

Perhaps I ought to say more on my own addiction- I have liked B for a few years, but really it was only a few sonatas I knew, but as I keep hearing him on a classical radio station, and you know how he grows on you...
And I did a course on his sonatas and heard the Hammerklavier and BAM!!!
I think you get the picture...

AeolianHarp
12-03-2013, 04:53 PM
Wow, I posted in this thread when I was only a few days out of my teens!

And here you still are Chris- still Beethoven mad I hope!

Michael
12-03-2013, 11:59 PM
I thought as I am new on here I'd like to see the archives and resurrect some old threads- new blood and all that.:p

Michael your addiction started just 3 months before I was born! I think we can safely say you are past curing now. I expect ypu must have quiet an interesting collection- LPs too I presume? I have some LPS, just need to get a record player!



I had a large LP collection until the CD arrived. I couldn't believe it when I was able to hear the piano sonatas without any background noise. The early discs were poor enough but they got better and gradually I was able to replace most of my vinyl favourites with CD versions. I never missed vinyl after that!

I bought the DGG complete edition on CD when it came out in 1997 - it cost me five hundred pounds - and nearly my marriage. ;) .In the past few years, much cheaper - but very good - complete editions have been available.

I didn't actually start counting until a few years ago and I discovered that I had about 500 CDs of Beethoven's works by now.
Yes - I think I must be incurable.

AeolianHarp
12-04-2013, 03:44 AM
I had a large LP collection until the CD arrived. I couldn't believe it when I was able to hear the piano sonatas without any background noise. The early discs were poor enough but they got better and gradually I was able to replace most of my vinyl favourites with CD versions. I never missed vinyl after that!


You won't believe what I have got! A 1930 gramophone ( no horn) and 78s! I have a 78 of Brahms- of course loads of crackles but it is charming. I like old records for the vintage charm, but yes Beethoven is best on the highest quality sound. Would be nice to find a way old 78 of something of his though.


I bought the DGG complete edition on CD when it came out in 1997 - it cost me five hundred pounds - and nearly my marriage. ;) .In the past few years, much cheaper - but very good - complete editions have been available.


DGG? I hope the missus has heard enough of his music to know he is worth it!


I didn't actually start counting until a few years ago and I discovered that I had about 500 CDs of Beethoven's works by now.
Yes - I think I must be incurable.


500 wow! I have 7 and the boxed set of piano sonatas played by Daniel Barenboim ( given to me by a friend) and mp3s on my portable HD and some Amazon ones on Cloud.

Sounds like you have all of Beethoven's works on CD then! I'm hearing new music by him daily on the Beethoven Only station- I love it Michael, as I am hearing some amazing works and often music played on all contemporary instruments which I prefer. Sometimes they even play sonatas played on Beethoven's own Broadwood which is incredible to hear- something he touched and played!!! :)


Have you got favourites? Mine have to be the piano sonatas, followed by the symphonies and piano concertos.

I'm listening to sonata in Fminor as I type this- his first one- doesn't it show such promise! Only 26 and on fire he was!!!- the energy of the Rondo is exhilarating! I bet it blew people's socks off- unlike anything else heard in sonatas at the time. Already distinctly Beethoven.

Yes, you are incurable and so am I! I cannot get enough of him so I can't!
As Mozart noted he is still giving us things to talk about!
Can there be anyone like Beethoven? No! His music is the most exciting, profound, passionate, moving and beautiful of all time.

Michael
12-04-2013, 04:05 AM
I wasn't trying to set a world record but I suddenly realised I had a great many CDs and I decided to stop buying any more.
You sound like you really have been bitten by the Beethoven bug. I can't say which section of his works are my favourites. One week it might be the sonatas, another the concertos and so on.

I suppose if I were forced to choose only one area of his compositions, it would have to be the string quartets. The funny thing was that I absolutely hated them when I first came across them, but I assumed (correctly) that Beethoven knew better than me, so I kept on playing them and I now consider them the core of his work. Like the sonatas, they span the early, middle and late periods of his work.

I love Mozart, Haydn and Bach and a good few others but the big B is the king!
(Elvis isn't bad either. :D )

AeolianHarp
12-04-2013, 04:35 AM
I wasn't trying to set a world record but I suddenly realised I had a great many CDs and I decided to stop buying any more.


Running out of space to store them were you?:p


You sound like you really have been bitten by the Beethoven bug.

He casts a spell....:) Noone can equal him!


I can't say which section of his works are my favourites. One week it might be the sonatas, another the concertos and so on.

Plenty to choose from and to suit all moods! I heard something on the Beethoven radio- a string quartet I think it was and it was so gentle and relaxing- I should have noted which one it was.


I suppose if I were forced to choose only one area of his compositions, it would have to be the string quartets. The funny thing was that I absolutely hated them when I first came across them, but I assumed (correctly) that Beethoven knew better than me, so I kept on playing them and I now consider them the core of his work. Like the sonatas, they span the early, middle and late periods of his work.

I am getting to know them...and yes of course he does!;)


I love Mozart, Haydn and Bach and a good few others but the big B is the king!
(Elvis isn't bad either. :D )

I like Mozart and Haydn too- also Chopin, Schubert, the Schumanns, Debussy and others (usually a particular work).
Elvis is better than pop music of today that's for sure, though pop is a genre that I am not much fond of- after listening to so much classical music it seems so simple and boring, with the exception of Sigur Ros from Iceland, but then they are not strictly pop music and hard to classify.

Harvey
02-22-2014, 04:33 AM
....On the classical appreciation journey, Beethoven is the end of the road.

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Peter (PDG)
Ah yes. There is a lot of great music out there, but for me, nothing surpasses Beethoven. The other music serves more for a diversion so that one does not lose their sense of appreciation for Beethoven. Just take an excursion away from Beethoven for a while and you'll come running back.

AeolianHarp
02-22-2014, 02:04 PM
You won't believe what I have got! A 1930 gramophone ( no horn) and 78s! I have a 78 of Brahms- of course loads of crackles but it is charming. I like old records for the vintage charm, but yes Beethoven is best on the highest quality sound. Would be nice to find a way old 78 of something of his though.


Since I posted this I looked through my 78s and I found The Turkish March there! A 1930s recording!!!

Yes, Harvey true lol...

Harvey
02-22-2014, 04:22 PM
Since I posted this I looked through my 78s and I found The Turkish March there! A 1930s recording!!!

Yes, Harvey true lol...

How about a 1935 Ninth from 78 RPM in Digital format: Felix Weingartner, conductor (https://archive.org/details/BeethovenSymphonyNo.9choral)
Scroll down for the downloadable files.

AeolianHarp
02-22-2014, 04:31 PM
How about a 1935 Ninth from 78 RPM in Digital format: Felix Weingartner, conductor (https://archive.org/details/BeethovenSymphonyNo.9choral)
Scroll down for the downloadable files.

Fascinating! It's the same orchestra as on my 78. The conductor for the Turkish March was Karl Alwin. Oh and on the other side of my 78 is Mozart's Turkish March. I haven't played it yet as I need to get new needles for the gramophone.My gramophone is a Columbia Grafonola.

P.S Can it be saved onto one's home computer?

Harvey
02-22-2014, 05:52 PM
RIght click the music files (I usually go with the VBR MP3s) and save to your hard drive. Then burn a disc.

That site has all sorts of music transposed from 78s and it is free, they link a copyright page and music copyrighting is variable depending on how old it is. Apparently stuff on 78s is old enough to be free.

AeolianHarp
02-22-2014, 08:11 PM
RIght click the music files (I usually go with the VBR MP3s) and save to your hard drive. Then burn a disc.

That site has all sorts of music transposed from 78s and it is free, they link a copyright page and music copyrighting is variable depending on how old it is. Apparently stuff on 78s is old enough to be free.

Great thanks!

Rocco
02-22-2014, 09:03 PM
I feel an all Beethoven craze coming on....(with the exception of my favorite works by Handel) Does that count? :)

AeolianHarp
02-22-2014, 09:20 PM
I feel an all Beethoven craze coming on....(with the exception of my favorite works by Handel) Does that count? :)

Oh indeed there is a LvB craze coming on hehe...though at the moment I am having a little Haydn craze ( watching a documentary)...

Harvey
02-22-2014, 10:53 PM
Hayden is very good. I have his Missa Brevis and it is quite beautiful.

AeolianHarp
02-23-2014, 12:27 AM
Hayden is very good. I have his Missa Brevis and it is quite beautiful.

Not heard that- must give it a listen!

PDG
02-24-2014, 10:08 PM
Since I posted this I looked through my 78s and I found The Turkish March there! A 1930s recording!!!
I'd call that a Turkish Delight! :)

AeolianHarp
02-25-2014, 02:16 AM
I'd call that a Turkish Delight! :)

Hehe